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Alex's Fishing Report 18 August 2016

This week I’m giving you a heads up on the 29th Humminbird Corroboree Park Challenge which is scheduled for 21-23 October.
Hosted by the Palmerston Game Fishing Club, this is the 29th anniversary of this iconic family fishing competition which is open to the general public.
The fishing grounds are all waterways east of Corroboree Park Tavern, including all Kakadu billabongs, that are open to the public and do not require a permit to enter.
As always, the winner will be the angler who catches the biggest barra by length, with a photo submitted of the fish on a measuring device together with the registration card.
Registration will take place at 5-8.00pm Friday 21 October or 7-10.00am Saturday 22 October, and there is free camping at Corroboree Park Tavern.
In total there are an incredible 18 prize categories, including plenty for the young male and female anglers in your family.
But it is still very much a serious barra competition with over $20,000 in prizes up for grabs.
I remember the old days of the Corroboree Park Challenge, when all fish were presented gilled and gutted at a weigh-in.
I don’t reckon too many of those Corroboree Billabong barra ever made it to the dinner table.
That’s the nature of all our major fishing competitions nowadays: all fish are measured and released, with a lie-detector photograph taken first.
When you think about it, the fishing area is vast, and includes plenty of tidal water at the Mary River, South Alligator River and East Alligator River, so there are plenty of places to target seriously-big barra.
No doubt, most competitors will be fishing Corroboree Billabong, especially those who will fish through the nights.
Lines in on the Friday is at 5.30pm, and competitors can fish right through so long as they are queued up at the tavern with their SD card of fish photos by 3.00pm Sunday.
It’s pretty hard to beat the tides this weekend for a shot at a harbour barra.
I love Sunday’s low tide in particular which gets down to just 1.2m at 2.20pm following an 8.08am high tide of 7.5m.
That’s over 6m of fall so the water will be dropping fast around midday, and that’s one window of opportunity to find a good barra bite on the snake drains winding off the flats from the mangroves.
The second and perhaps best window will be when the incoming 7.1m tide starts pushing bait into the gutters.
It won’t last long before the rising tide floods into the mangroves, but the barra know this too and will be hunting like mad while the bait is congregated in the swelling gutters waiting to get “home” in the mangroves.
By the way, if you are up to traveling to Bynoe Harbour, it’s the same recipe.

PHOTOS:

Brett Stevens (left) and Sam Toulim with a Corroboree double header caught on Gulp Shrimps fishing with Roger Sinclair.Brett Stevens (left) and Sam Toulim with a Corroboree double header caught on Gulp Shrimps fishing with Roger Sinclair.

Junior angler Isabel Povey caught this beaut barra in last year’s Humminbird Corroboree Park ChallengeJunior angler Isabel Povey caught this beaut barra in last year’s Humminbird Corroboree Park Challenge.

Mitchell Davis’ barra was also caught in last year’s Corroboree Park Challenge.Mitchell Davis’ barra was also caught in last year’s Corroboree Park Challenge.

Shaun Stringer fished Corroboree Billabong for his weigher in the junior section of the 2015 Corroboree Park Challenge.Shaun Stringer fished Corroboree Billabong for his weigher in the junior section of the 2015 Corroboree Park Challenge.